Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Heritage Sites

Welcome to Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Heritage Sites, an online resource dedicated to exploring our history and culture.

Black City: Vegetation

Madeline deRepentigny and Georgette McLeod harvesting spruce roots, 2006.

Madeline deRepentigny and Georgette McLeod harvesting spruce roots, 2006.

Ashley showing fresh-picked blueberries.

Ashley showing fresh-picked blueberries.

Many alpine flowers thrive in the often harsh weather by growing low to the ground, clumping together for mutual protection and insulating themselves with tiny hairs. Pink bistort (<em>Polygonum bistorta L.</em>)

Many alpine flowers thrive in the often harsh weather by growing low to the ground, clumping together for mutual protection and insulating themselves with tiny hairs. Pink bistort (Polygonum bistorta L.)

Bunchberry or Dwarf Dogwood.

Bunchberry or Dwarf Dogwood.

Sue Parsons/Jim Regimbal

Very near the tree line, Black City is situated in one of the few stands of spruce in the area. This far north, trees become fewer and smaller. The boreal forest gives way to taiga. Birch, alder, willow and some aspen grow here. Herbaceous plants tend to hug the ground staying out of the cold, dry winds that rob them of heat and moisture. In June and July, the area abounds in wildflowers.