Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Heritage Sites

Welcome to Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Heritage Sites, an online resource dedicated to exploring our history and culture.

Black City: Tombstone Territorial Park

Amid the glorious fall colours, willows in creek beds become “rivers of gold”.

Amid the glorious fall colours, willows in creek beds become “rivers of gold”.

Yukon Government
A stand of pale pink fireweed (<em>Epilobium augustifolium</em>).

A stand of pale pink fireweed (Epilobium augustifolium).

The peaks of the dramatic Tombstone Range.

The peaks of the dramatic Tombstone Range.

Lynx tracks near Grizzly Creek, February 2006.

Lynx tracks near Grizzly Creek, February 2006.

There’s a thousands and thousands of Indian people in that country and they not one kind of people, they all mixed up. That’s a God country there ’cause there's a lot of game there, everything there, so people from all over use that country because it’s pretty wealthy for game and caribou, sheep, you name it, they all there.

Percy Henry, 1993

The creation of Tombstone Territorial Park took place on October 25, 2004 after many years of study, planning and negotiation. As early as 1972, UNESCO recognized the diverse ecology and unique geology of this area. Twenty years later, the Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in requested protection for this part of our traditional territory. With strong public support, the park’s boundaries were finalized in December of 1999.

This land has sustained us for many generations. Signs of our ancestors can be found in the Hän and Gwich’in place names, ancient archaeological sites and our Elders’ stories. Preserving our connection to the land means protecting ongoing activities such as berry-picking, hunting, fishing and trapping. We come here to teach our children to hunt and be responsible stewards. We work with the Yukon Government and others to ensure the land continues to provide.

To learn more about Tombstone Territorial Park, visit the Park website set up by Environment Yukon.