Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Heritage Sites

Welcome to Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Heritage Sites, an online resource dedicated to exploring our history and culture.

Tr’ochëk: Archaeology

Archaeology crew in 2000. L-R: Kyle Isaac, R.J. Nagano and Randi Henry.

Archaeology crew in 2000. L-R: Kyle Isaac, R.J. Nagano and Randi Henry.

T.J. Hammer photographer
Archaeologist T.J. Hammer describing the excavations at Tr’ochëk to visitors.

Archaeologist T.J. Hammer describing the excavations at Tr’ochëk to visitors.

Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Archives, David Neufeld coll.
Rachel Olson and Georgette McLeod interview Edward Roberts at Tr’ochëk, 2006.

Rachel Olson and Georgette McLeod interview Edward Roberts at Tr’ochëk, 2006.

Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Archives, David Neufeld coll.

Tr’ochëk has been used as a fishing and hunting camp for many centuries. Unfortunately, periodic floods wiped out most of the remains of these camps. But people returned and made camps on the new silts left by the flood. The floods are clearly represented by grey silt layers in the soil separating dark organic layers that were the ground level between floods. At Tr’ochëk, archaeologists have identified at least six different occupation layers (strata) in the area bordering the Yukon River. Although the crew excavated less than one percent of the site, they found archaeological evidence attesting to the long use of Tr’ochëk as a fishing camp and hide processing site. Over several seasons, Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in student workers found that archaeology is an important way to learn about their forebears and to share their culture with others.