Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Heritage Sites

Welcome to Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Heritage Sites, an online resource dedicated to exploring our history and culture.

Tr’ochëk: Historic Remains

Boilers from the sawmill of the Klondike Mill Company.

Boilers from the sawmill of the Klondike Mill Company.

Anchored cables or “deadmen” were used to tie off sternwheelers.

Anchored cables or “deadmen” were used to tie off sternwheelers.

Midnight Arts photo
Erosion of the riverbank has left these rails from the Klondike Mines Railway lying on the beach.

Erosion of the riverbank has left these rails from the Klondike Mines Railway lying on the beach.

Greg Skuce photo
Steam pipes from O’Brien Brewery.

Steam pipes from O’Brien Brewery.

For a relatively brief time in its long history, Tr’ochëk was known as Klondike City or Lousetown. While this settlement lasted less than 20 years, it left a remarkable variety of remains. Unfortunately, none of the buildings still stand. During the peak of the gold rush, the site was thick with miners’ tents and cabins that cascaded down the hillside. The tiny stone platforms that supported these dwellings can still be seen on Klondike Hill. At its peak, the community included a store, brewery, lumber mill, stores, hotels, saloons and a red light district. From 1906 on, this was a railway terminus with repair facilities. Once the rush was over, much of the site was cultivated by market gardeners. Due to the thick overgrowth on Tr’ochëk, the few remains are difficult to see and consist mostly of foundation remains and a few pieces of rusting metal.