Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Heritage Sites

Welcome to Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Heritage Sites, an online resource dedicated to exploring our history and culture.

Tr’ochëk: Setting

Panoramic view of the mouth of the Klondike River, Dawson City on the left and Tr’ochëk on the right.

Panoramic view of the mouth of the Klondike River, Dawson City on the left and Tr’ochëk on the right.

Tr’ochëk lies on a low flood plain at the confluence of the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. Over the centuries, the site has been shaped by the erosion and the redeposition of materials as well as by human activity. The site originally had three parts: the low lying land north of the Klondike River, Klondike Island, and the hill behind the site.

When a sawmill operated on Klondike Island, the channel between the island and Tr’ochëk was dammed to store floating logs. This channel eventually silted in and the island is now part of the mainland.

The soils of Tr’ochëk are a mixture of clays and river silt that are washed away and redeposited by the regular floods. For many years, this rich soil supported a farm that grew lavish crops during the long summer days.

Parts of the former island have washed away while the sawmill and farm site are now covered in a dense forest.

The site is backed by a steep, rocky bluff now known as Klondike Hill. The hilltop was cleared and levelled during the placer mining in the 1950s. This part of the Yukon was never glaciated and Tr’ochëk lies within the area known as Beringia.