Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Heritage Sites

Welcome to Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Heritage Sites, an online resource dedicated to exploring our history and culture.

Tr’ochëk: Tr’ochëk Today

Robert Service School students take a break after building willow frames of traditional shelters, 2008.

Robert Service School students take a break after building willow frames of traditional shelters, 2008.

Students at Robert Service School work on a mini dig, learning about the archaeology and culture of Tr’ochëk.

Students at Robert Service School work on a mini dig, learning about the archaeology and culture of Tr’ochëk.

David Neufeld photograph
Robert Service School students try out their home-made shelter.

Robert Service School students try out their home-made shelter.

A work crew takes a break after shovelling out the Tr’ochëk dock in spring.

A work crew takes a break after shovelling out the Tr’ochëk dock in spring.

Today Tr’ochëk continues its original function as a seasonal fish camp. Occasionally people harvest berries on the hillside. The Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Heritage Department has organized culture camps on the site, giving demonstrations of activities such as beaver trapping. Grade 4 students from Robert Service School has an archaeological unit related to the site. The Grade 5 class has made day trips to the site in spring and fall.

Over the years, a number of mushers travelling to Dawson in winter have staked out their dog teams at Tr’ochëk. There is some recreational use of the site. Dawson residents ski and snowshoe along a rough trail cut on the site in 2007. In summer, the larger dredge pond is used as a swimming hole.

Today, the First Nation seeks to protect the site’s cultural resources and create a peaceful place of natural beauty for relaxation and contemplation where their citizens and others can learn of Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in culture.